Archive for the ‘Grid’ category

By Romany Webb Two days after making landfall in the Florida Panhandle, Hurricane Michael has now moved out to sea, leaving behind damage that could take years to repair. In Florida’s Mexico Beach, where Michael first hit as a category four storm, entire blocks of homes and businesses have been destroyed. Further inland, more structures […]

by Justin Gundlach and Romany Webb Resilience—the capacity to withstand, absorb, recover from, and better adapt to disruption—is currently a popular topic of discussion and debate. Several factors, including a string of disasters and unrelated but coincident regulatory processes, have made resilience a key objective for a wide array of policy makers. They include the […]

by Justin Gundlach As a spate of disasters in the past few months has made painfully clear to people in Texas, Florida, Louisiana, Puerto Rico, and northern California, designing the electric grid to be reliable at all times requires anticipating and preparing for destructive hazards that can interrupt its operation. That is, reliability requires resilience, […]

by Justin Gundlach Due to damage from Hurricane Irma, the lights are out in much of southern Florida—an inconvenience to many and fatal to some. Meanwhile, in Texas, power still has not been restored everywhere in the aftermath of Hurricane Harvey. As the Wall Street Journal headline says of both states, “Power Outage Pushes Limits.” […]

by Justin Gundlach Three weeks ago, at the invitation of the Canadian Consulate and Hydro Québec, I traveled to see two enormous hydropower facilities. One of them, La Grande 2-A, is part of the La Grande Complex of dams, turbines, and electricity substations located in the James Bay region (see map at right). Getting there […]

by Romany Webb and Justin Gundlach There has been much talk in recent weeks about pricing carbon to reduce greenhouse gas emissions. Earlier this month, a group of former Republican cabinet members proposed adoption of a nationwide carbon price, starting at $40 per ton. That seems unlikely, however. Even the proposal’s main architect, former Secretary […]

Justin Gundlach Climate Law Fellow As round after round has passed in the political and legal struggle at the federal level over regulating sources of greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions, states have rushed in to try to fill the void. Minnesota sought to do so in 2007 when it passed the Next Generation Energy Act. That […]

Arijit Sen, Sabin Center Summer Intern On June 30, 2015, Maine became the third jurisdiction in the United States to approve Value-of-Solar (VOS) pricing for distributed solar generation.[1] Governor Paul LePage had vetoed the legislation[2] on June 26, 2015, citing concerns that the legislature had passed the bill “hastily,” leaving “the Maine people…disenfranchised and without […]

Arijit Sen, Sabin Center Summer Intern Recently, two competing plans to reform California’s four-tier electricity rate structure of the three investor-owned utilities (IOUs)[1] have emerged from the California Public Utilities Commission (CPUC). On April 21, 2015, CPUC administrative law judges (ALJs) McKinney and Halligan filed a proposal that suggests implementing a two-tiered system, with a […]

The Sabin Center has published “Electricity Sector Adaptation to Heat Waves” by Sofia Aivalioti, a student in the Joint European Master in Environmental Studies – Cities & Sustainability program and a Visiting Scholar at the Center last fall. The white paper takes an up-close look at the impacts of extreme heat events on the electricity generation, transmission and […]

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