Tag Archives: Jeff Sessions

Trump’s “Religious Freedom” Guidance Likely Imminent and Harmful to LGBTQ Communities and Others

Cross-posted on Medium.

Last week, Attorney General Jeff Sessions gave a closed-press speech at a summit hosted by the Alliance Defending Freedom (ADF), a group that has notoriously fought to undermine LGBTQ and reproductive rights for years under the guise of protecting religious freedom. Among other concerning statements, Sessions promised that he would soon issue guidance for all federal agencies to implement President Trump’s recently enacted “religious freedom” executive order:

The department is finalizing this guidance, and I will soon issue it. The guidance will also help agencies follow the Religious Freedom Restoration Act. Congress enacted RFRA so that, if the federal government imposes a burden on somebody’s religious practice, it had better have a compelling reason. That is a demanding standard, and it’s the law of the land. We will follow it just as faithfully as we follow every other federal law. If we’re going to ensure that religious liberty is adequately protected and our country remains free, then we must ensure that RFRA is followed.

Given Sessions’ skewed prioritization of some, but not all, “religious liberty” rights over other fundamental equality guarantees under the Constitution, there is good reason to be concerned about the potential impact on LGBTQ and others, particularly Muslim communities, women, people of color, and those seeking access to reproductive healthcare.

As we discussed in our report Church, State and the Trump Administration, before taking office, Sessions made a career fighting against justice and equality for marginalized communities, including LGBTQ communities. While in the Senate, he voted against the Employment Non-Discrimination Act (ENDA), which would have protected workers nationwide from discrimination on the basis of sexual orientation. He called the Supreme Court’s decision in Obergefell v. Hodges, which found that the Fourteenth Amendment guarantees a right to marry for same-sex couples, “unconstitutional,” and “beyond what [he] considers to be the realm of reality.” He has also publicly opposed protecting LGBTQ people in federal hate crimes legislation and the Violence Against Women Act, voting against both bills while in the Senate. And when the reauthorization of the Runaway and Homeless Youth Act came up for a vote, he opposed that too, claiming that explicit protections for vulnerable LGBTQ youth meant it “could have discriminated against faith-based organizations.”

Furthermore, Sessions supported the First Amendment Defense Act (FADA) as an original co-sponsor. FADA would forbid the federal government from enforcing a wide range of health, benefits, and antidiscrimination laws against individuals and businesses who act on “a religious belief or moral conviction that marriage is or should be recognized as the union of one man and one woman, or that sexual relations are properly reserved to such a marriage.” This could lead to sweeping discrimination against LGBTQ people and anyone who has had sex outside of a different-sex marriage, including unmarried pregnant and parenting women. As we’ve noted in a previous report, these types of exemptions have a serious and disproportionate impact on women and pregnant people of color.

Although no information has been leaked about the pending guidance, Trump’s previously leaked Executive Order, which was significantly longer than the one he ultimately issued, may provide some insight into what the guidance may prioritize. As we discussed in a report focusing on the potential consequences of the leaked Executive Order, this could include a range of harmful outcomes, including broad exemptions that would allow private and nonprofit organizations that contract with the federal government to violate federal civil rights and nondiscrimination laws in providing social services, educational opportunities, healthcare, employment or other services—with impunity.

If Sessions’ actions in the Department of Justice are any indication, the guidance is likely to create broad opportunities for agencies across the federal government to roll back Obama-era civil rights protections and other important constitutional guarantees, using “religious freedom” as a cover.