MEDIA ADVISORY: Columbia Law School Scholars Submit Comment on Proposed HHS Rule

SUBJECT: HHS Rule Fails to Protect the Conscience of All Health Care Providers | Proposed Rule Ignores Providers Who Support Reproductive Health Care

FROM: The Public Rights/Private Conscience Project (PRPCP), Columbia Law School

CONTENT: “Not only does this scheme fail to ensure patient health, it also fails to safeguard the very right it claims to defend — the freedom of conscience.”

CONTACTS:
Elizabeth Boylan, 212–854–0167, eboyla@law.columbia.edu
Elizabeth Reiner Platt, 212–854–8079, ep2801@columbia.edu


New York, NY, March 27, 2018 — In medical facilities across the country, doctors whose conscience would require them to perform a sterilization on a patient who requests one, offer truthful information about accessing abortion services, or provide comprehensive LGBTQ+ health care are forbidden from doing so by their employer. The conscience of such medical providers is entirely ignored by the U.S. Department of Health and Human Service’s (HHS) recently proposed rule that purports to “ensure that persons or entities” providing health care “are not subjected to certain practices or policies that violate conscience, coerce, or discriminate.” As explained in a comment submitted today by the Columbia Law School Public Rights/Private Conscience Project (PRPCP), HHS’s proposed rule provides conscience protection only to those whose religious views match those of the administration. The rule is therefore legally suspect.

The HHS rule would enact sweeping protections for medical providers, health care facilities, insurance plans, and even employers who believe that abortion, sterilization, and other healthcare services are morally wrong. In contrast, it provides only extremely limited protections to those whose religious or moral beliefs lead them to offer their patients the full range of sexual and reproductive health care.

There are many such providers; studies and articles have described a wide range of conflicts between physicians who wish to provide reproductive health care to patients, especially emergency care, and faith-based medical facilities that prohibit this care. Furthermore, abortion providers frequently speak of their practice in religious or moral terms. To provide just a few examples, Dr. George Tiller referred to his work providing abortion care as a “ministry.” Dr. Sara Imershein has described providing abortion care as a “mitzvah” and said that “No one should be able to step in the way of what I consider to be my moral obligation.” Dr. LeRory Carhart stated in an interview, “I think what I’m doing is because of God, not in spite of God.”

“Under the proposed rule, a doctor who refuses to provide care that is medically indicated and requested by a patient is protected, while a doctor who does provide this care in accordance with her conscience can be fired,” said Elizabeth Reiner Platt, Director of PRPCP. “Not only does this scheme fail to ensure patient health, it also fails to safeguard the very right it claims to defend — the freedom of conscience.”


The Public Rights/Private Conscience Project

The Public Rights/Private Conscience Project’s mission is to bring legal academic expertise to bear on the multiple contexts in which religious liberty rights conflict with or undermine other fundamental rights to equality and liberty. We undertake approaches to the developing law of religion that both respects the importance of religious liberty and recognizes the ways in which too broad an accommodation of these rights threatens Establishment Clause violations and can unsettle a proper balance with other competing fundamental rights. Our work takes the form of legal research and scholarship, public policy interventions, advocacy support, and academic and media publications.

To learn more, please visit us at http://www.law.columbia.edu/gender-sexuality/public-rights-private-conscience-project