From Birth Control to Death: Facing Black Women’s Maternal Mortality

Event Announcement
Friday, March 30, 2018
From Birth Control to Death: Facing Black Women’s Maternal Mortality
Barbara Jordan Conference Center | Henry J. Kaiser Foundation
1330 G Street, NW | Washington, DC 20005
1:00 pm – 2:30 pm

Eventbrite: www.bit.ly/birthcontroltodeath

America has the highest maternal mortality rate of any developed nation, according to the World Health Organization which found that between 700 – 1200 women died in the United States each year from pregnancy or childbirth complications. The United States’ maternal mortality rate has more than doubled since 1990, climbing from 12 to 28 deaths per 100,000 births.

We know that not all women are equally impacted by this phenomenon. According to NPR and ProPublica, Black women are 243% more likely to die in childbirth than white women. However, what many do not realize is that Black women’s vulnerability to maternal mortality is not a class determined issue. Factors that contribute to pregnancy and childbirth complications include damaging stereotypes about Black women’s strength and resiliency, and the pervasive notion that their pain is less real than that of their white women counterparts – factors that impact all Black women regardless of their socioeconomic success, academic achievement, and overall health and wellness.

As much as Black women have been valorized for their strength, we must recognize the elements of this myth that constitute relics of slavery. The indestructibility of Black women has long been an excuse for overwork and under-protection, a rationalization for our exploitation and abuse that has morphed into a dangerous stereotype that we have all too often internalized. These assumptions gravely imperil and undermine Black women’s health, both mental and physical, and lead to higher rates of heart disease, strokes, and maternal mortality.

Additionally, pregnant women of color are at greater risk of being deprived of a range of reproductive health services in many US states as a result of their disproportionate use of Catholic hospitals, according to a new report released on January 19th by the Columbia Law School Public Rights/Private Conscience Project (PRPCP) in partnership with Public Health Solutions. Bearing Faith: The Limits of Catholic Health Care for Women of Color compares racial disparities in birth rates at hospitals that place religious restrictions on health care.  Catholic-affiliated hospitals are governed by the “Ethical and Religious Directives for Catholic Health Care Services,” a set of strict guidelines that prohibit doctors from providing contraceptives, sterilization, some treatments for ectopic pregnancy, abortion, and fertility services regardless of their patients’ wishes, the urgency of a patient’s medical condition, the doctor’s own medical judgment, or the standard of care in the medical profession.

The report finds that in many states, women of color are far more likely than white women to give birth at Catholic hospitals, putting them at greater risk of having their health needs determined by the religious beliefs of bishops rather than the medical judgment of doctors; This finding is especially troubling given that women of color already face a range of health disparities—including lower rates of insurance coverage and higher rates of pregnancy complications—which increases their need for comprehensive reproductive health care.

To hear radical discourse on the implications of these issues, and the steps we must take moving forward to address these systemic injustices, join the African American Policy Forum at The Barbara Jordan Conference Center in Washington DC on March 30, 2018 from 1:00-2:30pm for the closing panel of their week-long program, #HerDreamDeferred 2018: From Birth Control to Death: Facing Black Women’s Maternal Mortality.

The panel will feature remarks from Kira Shepherd, Director of the Racial Justice Program with Columbia Law School’s Public Rights/Private Conscience Project, among others, and will explore the ways in which stereotypes around the invincibility of Black women, their environmental circumstances and the gaps in culturally competent health care all intersect and interact to endanger Black women in specific and extreme ways.

Further details about this event may be found at Eventbrite; for questions about this program, contact Henone Girma at henone.girma@aapf.org, or Liz Boylan at eboyla@law.columbia.edu.