Religious Freedom for Refugees? Not So Fast…

By Elizabeth Platt, Associate Director, Public Rights/Private Conscience Project

Mere months after a host of prominent conservatives condemned the Supreme Court’s marriage equality ruling as an attack on religious freedom (one particularly colorful character called it “judicial tyranny” that would lead to the criminalization of Christianity), these same politicians seem to have had a change of heart. Not on marriage equality, of course, but on the importance of religious freedom in American society.

From shutting down mosques to barring Muslims from the oval office to demanding a Christianity test for Syrian refugees to the outrageous (albeit unclear) suggestion of creating Muslim registration system, conservatives seem to be caught in a vicious cycle of Islamophobic one-upmanship. The very same voices who clamored for new religious exemption laws and even held rallies for religious freedom featuring “special guests victimized by government persecution,” seem to be leading the charge against Muslims both at home and abroad.

Lest one think these arguments have been taken up only among the most extreme on the right, even the relatively moderate Jeb Bush argued recently that “we should focus our efforts as it relates to refugees on the Christians that are being slaughtered.” And more than half the nation’s Governors are doing all they can to prevent Syrian refugees from being placed in their state.

Perhaps the most explicitly discriminatory suggestion has come from Ted Cruz—host of the aforementioned rally for religious freedom. Rather than Bush’s suggestion of prioritizing Christian refugees, Cruz has stated that only Christians should be permitted to enter the U.S., and Muslim refugees should be kept out, period.

Unsurprisingly, Cruz has not offered a plan on how to determine which refugees are in fact Christian. Bush suggested putting the burden of proof on the refugees themselves— “I mean, you can prove you’re a Christian,” he explained.

In the past, however, conservatives haven’t been so keen on government-imposed tests of religious faith. Hobby Lobby and other religious exemption cases brought under the Religious Freedom Restoration Act (RFRA) require the party requesting an accommodation to demonstrate a substantial burden on their sincerely held religious belief. Conservatives have argued that this should be an extremely weak test—contending that courts have no authority, or ability, to inquire into the sincerity of a religious belief, or to evaluate how closely it correlates with official religious doctrines. So if the Supreme Court shouldn’t be able to question the religious beliefs of a craft store owner, why do conservatives want State Department or Department of Homeland Security agents deciding whether someone is Christian?

The recent calls for explicit religious discrimination and persecution against Muslims by major political leaders are chilling. They also belie any claims that these politicians are honestly concerned with religious freedom. Rather, they are interested in religious rights only for those who share their views on hot-button political issues like abortion, contraception, and LGBT rights.

For those who disagree… hope you enjoyed the holiday and escaped the stealth halal turkeys.